Wood Carving and Design

Wood Carving and Design

Wood carving is sculpting a figure or any object from a block of wood using special tools. These include planer, chisel, mallet and many others. While traditionally, these have been non-mechanised with carvers meticulously carrying out their work manually, some modern equipment are mechanised and this enables the carver to complete the basic work of preparing the wood for sculpturing quickly and effectively.

While carving of wood has been carried on for ages by master craftsmen old works are rarely found in the world while sculpture on stone and bronze have stood the test of time. Excavations have led to discoveries of carvings in metal and stone that are thousands of years old. Not so with wood. This is because wood as a material is vulnerable to insect damage, disease and decay due to exposure to natural elements. However, some extensive wood carvings that have stood the test of time can be seen in China, Japan, Africa and Oceania and nearby regions.

Wood is soft when compared to stone and metal and is therefore more amiable to fine and intricate designs. The early European wood carvings in Germany, Russia, Italy and France dating back to the Middle Ages still inspire awe amongst visitors to the many museums in these countries where these have been carefully preserved and maintained. In England, there are many such instances of wood carvings of the 16th and 17 centuries that represented Christian iconography. Oak was the traditional medium of that time and finely carved doors and other fixtures can be seen in many English and Scottish castles in the UK.

In today’s world, exquisitely carved wood furniture and panelling are still being requisitioned from master craftsmen for high end luxury homes and offices. There is after all nothing to beat the glamour quotient of beautifully carved gleaming wood sculptures.